How to Prepare a drawing for Laser Cutting

2

Your drawing should outline your part(s).  It should not contain dimensions, tables, or notes

3

Your drawing can contain multiple individual parts, or a single part

A drawing with multiple parts:

A drawing with one metal parts, with letter cutouts:

Both types of drawing are OK, but make sure you are getting what you want!  If our system detects multiple parts, it will let you know.

4

Part outlines must not contain gaps or overlapping lines

Our system follows the lines in your drawing to figure out what should be inside or outside your finished part (we pierce the metal and lead-in outside your finished part).  If your outlines have gaps, the system cannot determine where your part begins and ends.

The part below has a gap in the H, circled in red:

If your drawing has a gap like the one shown above, it will tell you it has found an "open" contour.  We can cut open contours, but the machine will pierce directly on the line and follow it, so you may a hole at the pierce point.  Our system also allows you to tell us to engrave an open contour, or ignore it.

READY TO GET STARTED?

1

Choose a supported file type

An SVG is a vector file format that can be created using programs like Adobe Illustrator, Inkscape, and others.  

SVG

A DXF is a common file used by Computer Aided Drafting (CAD) programs like Fusion 360, SolidWorks, and others.  Designs made in CAD and exported as DXFs are most likely to be ready for manufacturing, but you can use other software and file types as well.

DXF

Our system can accept DXF, SVG, and AI file types.  Whatever you use, keep in mind that your drawing should outline your part.  Your drawing should not contain any geometry that does not represent a edge of your part (or, for more advanced users, bend or engrave lines).

The AI file format is the native format used by Adobe Illustrator.  You can prep your designs in Illustrator, or in other vector-editing programs like Inkscape that support the AI file format.

AI